Newsroom

Newsroom

We've been hard at work

2020, August 26

Riverside-San Bernardino County Indian Health completes 56,063 screens for 20,493 unduplicated patients in their medical and behavioral health departments at seven (7) health centers.

2020, June 16

The United States Patent and Trademark Office issues a registered trademark (No. 6,078,403) for Screendox new stylized “X” logo.

2020, May 27

JLWA works with the State of California Office of Problem Gambling, UCLA, and Riverside-San Bernardino County Indian Health to add the BBGS Problem Gambling screening tool to Screendox.

2020, May 6

The Aces Aware team gives JLWA written permissions to use the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) screening tool for Screendox.

2020, May 4

The National Institute of Mental Health gives JLWA written permission to use the ASQ suicide ideation screening tool for Screendox.

2020, May 1

The MAPI Research Trust (on behalf of Pfizer, Inc.) gives JLWA written permission to use the GAD-2 and GAD-7 general anxiety disorder screening tool for Screendox.

2020, April 14

The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma purchases Screendox for 11 health centers.

2020, March 3

The Center for Youth Wellness gives JLWA written permission to use the Pediatric ACEs Screening and Related Life-Events Screener (PEARLS) screening tool for Screendox.

2020, January 13

The United American Indian Involvement (UAII) in Los Angeles installs Screendox in four (4) departments. The UAII becomes the first urban Indian health care organization in the United States to use Screendox.

2020, January 1

JLWA makes Screendox available to Indian health programs nationwide.

2019, Spring Edition

The National American Indian & Alaska Native, Prevention Technology Transfer Center features Riverside-San Bernardino County Indian Health work with Screendox in the 2019 in Prevention IN OUR NATIVE AMERICAN COMMUNITIES. VOL 1, ISSUE 1, SPRING 2019, pages 10-11.

2019, April 29

Columbia University Lighthouse Project gives JLWA written permissions to use the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale tool for Screendox.

2019, February 28

JLWA, 3SI2, and eMedApps complete CareBridge API for interface with NextGen EHR.

2017, June 27

The United States Patent and Trademark Office issues a registered trademark (No. 5,231,457) for Screendox stylized “X” logo.

2017, December 21

JLWA completes statewide behavioral health screening, intervention, and referral resource evaluation of 38 tribal and urban Indian health programs in California for the California Area Indian Health Service.

2016, November 15

The United States Patent and Trademark Office issues a registered trademark (No. 5,083,592) for the name Screendox.

2015, October 8

Dr. Harvey Skinner gives JLWA written permissions to use the DAST-10 non-medical drug use screening tool for Screendox.

2012, December 17

3SI2 completes the Screendox software. Alpha testing is completed and ready for beta test installation at RSBCIHI.

2011, April 17

RSBCIH signs the Screendox User Agreement to beta test Screendox at seven (7) locations and to be the first tribal health care organization in the United States to use Screendox.

2010, November 3

3SI2 starts development of the Screendox API for RPMS EHR interface.

2010, September 24

JLWA completes the Branching Diagram, Content Plan, and System Functionality Requirements for the Screendox API for the RPMS EHR interface.

2010, June 22

The IHS Office of Information Technology works with JLWA to develop the Screendox API for the RPMS EHR interface.

2010, June 1

JLWA registers Screendox software code with the United States Copyright Office (TX0007432638).

2010, March 1

3SI2 completes the Screendox software for alpha testing.

2010, January 12

3SI2 starts development of the Screendox software application.

2009, December 29

3SI2 signs the contract to develop the Screendox software applications.

2009, November 30

The MAPI Research Trust (on behalf of Pfizer, Inc.) signs the User Agreement for JLWA to use the PHQ-2 and PHQ-9 depression screening tool for Screendox.

2009, November 6

Kevin Sherin, MD signs the User Agreement for JLWA to use the HITS intimate partner/domestic violence screening tool for Screendox.

2009, November 3

The American Medical Association signs the User Agreement for JLWA to use the CAGE alcohol screening tool for Screendox.

2009, October 8

JLWA registers the Screendox Branching Diagram, Content Plan, and System Functionality Requirements with the United States Copyright Office (TX0007142059).

2009, October 4

JLWA completes the Screendox Branching Diagram, Content Plan, and System Functionality Requirements.

2009, September 30

JLWA completes the national evaluation of “Behavioral Health Screening Barriers and Best Practices in Primary Health Care” at 17 federal and tribal health care sites for the IHS and ASPE.

2007, September 27

The IHS and the Office of the Assistance Secretary of Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) contracts with JLWA to conduct a national evaluation of “Behavioral Health Screening Barriers and Best Practices in Primary Health Care” at 17 federal and tribal health care sites.

We've been hard at work

2020, August 26

Riverside-San Bernardino County Indian Health completes 56,063 screens for 20,493 unduplicated patients in their medical and behavioral health departments at seven (7) health centers.

2020, June 16

The United States Patent and Trademark Office issues a registered trademark (No. 6,078,403) for Screendox new stylized “X” logo.

2020, May 27

JLWA works with the State of California Office of Problem Gambling, UCLA, and Riverside-San Bernardino County Indian Health to add the BBGS Problem Gambling screening tool to Screendox.

2020, May 6

The Aces Aware team gives JLWA written permissions to use the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) screening tool for Screendox.

2020, May 4

The National Institute of Mental Health give JLWA written permission to use the ASQ suicide ideation screening tool for Screendox.

2020, May 1

The MAPI Research Trust (on behalf of Pfizer, Inc.) gives JLWA written permission to use the GAD-2 and GAD-7 general anxiety disorder screening tool for Screendox.

2020, April 14

The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma purchases Screendox for 11 health centers.

2020, March 3

The Center for Youth Wellness gives JLWA written permission to use the Pediatric ACEs Screening and Related Life-events Screener (PEARLS) screening tool for Screendox.

2020, January 13

The United American Indian Involvement (UAII) in Los Angeles installs Screendox in four (4) departments. The UAII becomes the first urban Indian health care organization in the United States to use Screendox.

2020, January 1

JLWA makes Screendox available to Indian health programs nationwide.

2019, Spring Edition

The National American Indian & Alaska Native, Prevention Technology Transfer Center features Riverside-San Bernardino County Indian Health work with Screendox in the 2019 in Prevention in Our Native American Communities, Vol 1, Issue 1, Spring 2019.

2019, April 29

Columbia University, Lighthouse Project gives JLWA written permissions to use the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale tool for Screendox.

2019, February 28

JLWA, 3SI2, and eMedApps complete CareBridge API for interface with NextGen EHR.

2017, June 27

The United States Patent and Trademark Office issues a registered trademark (No. 5,231,457) for Screendox stylized “X” logo.

2017, December 21

JLWA completes statewide behavioral health screening, intervention, and referral resource evaluation of 38 tribal and urban Indian health programs in California for the California Area Indian Health Service.

2016, November 15

The United States Patent and Trademark Office issues a registered trademark (No. 5,083,592) for Screendox name.

2015, October 8

Dr. Harvey Skinner gives JLWA written permissions to use the DAST-10 non-medical drug use screening tool for Screendox.

2012, December 17

3SI2 completes the Screendox software. Alpha testing is completed and ready for beta test installation at RSBCIHI.

2011, April 17

RSBCIH signs the Screendox User Agreement to beta test Screendox at seven (7) locations and to be the first tribal health care organization in the United States to use Screendox.

2010, November 3

3SI2 starts development of the Screendox API for RPMS EHR interface.

2010, September 24

JLWA completes the Branching Diagram, Content Plan & System Functionality Requirements for the Screendox API for RPMS EHR interface.

2010, June 22

IHS Office of Information Technology works with JLWA to develop the Screendox API for RPMS EHR interface.

2010, June 1

JLWA registers Screendox software code with the United States Copyright Office (TX0007432638).

2010, March 1

3SI2 completes the Screendox software for alpha testing.

2010, January 12

3SI2 starts development of the Screendox software application.

2009, December 29

3SI2 signs the contract to develop the Screendox software.

2009, November 30

The MAPI Research Trust (on behalf of Pfizer, Inc.) signs the User Agreement for JLWA to use the PHQ-2 and PHQ-9 depression screening tool for Screendox.

2009, November 6

Kevin Sherin, MD signs the User Agreement for JLWA to use the HITS intimate partner/domestic violence screening tool for Screendox.

2009, November 3

The American Medical Association signs the User Agreement for JLWA to use the CAGE alcohol screening tool for Screendox.

2009, October 8

JLWA registers the Screendox Branching Diagram, Content Plan & System Functionality Requirements with the United States Copyright Office (TX0007142059).

2009, October 4

JLWA completes the Screendox Branching Diagram, Content Plan & System Functionality Requirements.

2009, September 30

JLWA completes the national evaluation of “Behavioral Health Screening Barriers and Best Practices in Primary Health Care” at 17 federal and tribal health care sites for the IHS and Assistant Secretary of Planning and Evaluation (ASPE).

2007, September 27

The U.S. Indian Health Service (IHS), with funding from the Office of the Assistance Secretary of Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), contracts with JLWA to conduct a national evaluation of “Behavioral Health Screening Barriers and Best Practices in Primary Health Care” at 17 federal and tribal health care sites for the IHS and Assistant Secretary of Planning and Evaluation (ASPE).